Smart Cities and Inclusive Innovation

IPaT’s work in this area focuses on the daily lives of communities – how they live, work and play. We are finding innovative approaches to shaping sustainable cities with research that thinks globally, while acting locally. IPaT is examining the transformative role of technology in transportation, civic engagement, and disaster recovery focusing on novel communication and information technologies to aid communities during disaster and crisis situations.

Featured Projects

The mobile app OneBusAway, which tracks public transportation in real time, now includes arrival times for MARTA trains in addition to the MARTA buses and Georgia Tech shuttles already featured in the app. Read More
Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed joined Georgia Tech President G.P. “Bud” Peterson in announcing several citywide cycling initiatives. Among them was Cycle Atlanta, a Georgia Tech-developed iPhone application that tracks cycling routes and is designed to help the city with future cycling decisions. Read More
In the 21st century, many artists and designers are uncertain about how to create the modern day version of democracy in order to demonstrate and represent the current social conditions and expected futures. Within five years of research through crafting, design researchers Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel examined the shift in contemporary democracy from “matters of fact” to “matters of concern” and studied the role human-computer interaction (HCI) design has in this shift.  Read More
The MAPPD project designs and deploys groups of sensors in smart city testbeds designated by the City of Atlanta in its SmartATL strategy. The first sensor, developed by Georgia Tech, was placed in the North Avenue smart city corridor in the Summer of 2016, and several more are scheduled. MAPPD addresses the technical challenges and other aspects of scaling up a smart city sensor network. Read More
The Atlanta Streetcar has begun using a new real-time dispatching method developed at Georgia Tech that eliminates the need for schedules and cuts down on passenger wait times.
School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Kari Watkins and Ph.D student Simon Berrebi  developed an algorithm that ensures each vehicle is spaced evenly along the 2.7 mile route in downtown Atlanta, maximizing the frequency of service. Read More